Resist(d)ance - Resistance and Dance within the Postcolonial Lives of Jamaican Dancehall Street Dancers

Resist(d)ance - Resistance and Dance within the Postcolonial Lives of Jamaican Dancehall Street Dancers

von: Cyrielle Tamby

GRIN Verlag , 2020

ISBN: 9783346175915 , 121 Seiten

Format: PDF

Kopierschutz: frei

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Preis: 34,99 EUR

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Resist(d)ance - Resistance and Dance within the Postcolonial Lives of Jamaican Dancehall Street Dancers


 

Master's Thesis from the year 2019 in the subject African Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,3, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder) (Europa Universit├Ąt Viadrina / University of California, Berkeley), course: Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakult├Ąt / African Diaspora Studies, language: English, abstract: This paper queries how social practices are reimagined within black cultures such as Jamaican Dancehall to resist various attempts to silence their potential of existence and humanity. In the first chapter, dancehall street dancers write themselves into the landscape of a street party in Kingston. Here, different notions of labor, temporalities and performances are reconfigured into a mode of survival and insurgence.Chapter two articulates the constitution of home with the process of diasporic making, revealing how Jamaican actors of the Dancehall culture negotiate resistance in the space of New York. Chapter three deals with transactional and transnational love relationships in the dancehall scene and focuses on the understanding of dance tourism as a form of gendered sex tourism. Chapter four dives into the vernacular poetry of resistance offered by Instagram as a visual economy of bodies and words and addresses the role of social media in producing blackness as agency. While reflecting the multiple positions of dancer, researcher, friend and woman of color, the author depicts Jamaican Dancehall as an archipelago of resistance that offers a counter-response to the structural conditions of poverty. Jamaican Dancehall appears as a mirror of black people's lives in the inner-city of Kingston, a sociocultural puzzle articulated by various politics of fashion, music, and dance. The paper highlights different social practices performed by dancehall dancers in Jamaica to challenge postcolonial living realities reflected in socio-spatial immobility. Based on fieldwork in Jamaica between 2014 and 2019, narrative interviews, informal conversations with dancers, and my auto-ethnographic position as a professional dancehall dancer since 2012, the author explores different territories of resistance as sites of expression of the selves as dancehall subjectivities.